Redlines Publishing

Projects

REDLINES Publishing is a Baltimore based independent publishing concern that focuses on contextually appropriate literature for the masses.  We so far have published fiction, but will be adding historical fiction to our catalogue this year and creative non-fiction in the future.


In relation to other speculative/fantasy themes, I look at flight/travel as a choice or privilege that does not have to come at the expense of another individual. To frame it as a “geek,” when there are social media polls about “What is your super power?” or which superpower you prefer? flight (or teleportation) generally wins. M:M allows me to propagate the idea that through a communal effort, individuals all can achieve a certain successful outcome; in the film, the Mothers fly because they “sang and danced until we kicked up our own stardust.” Here again is the work that matters to me as an Afrofuturist- tying this idea to other work and myths in the African tradition to bring them into the future (Sankofa).
— http://bsadarchive.wixsite.com/mysite/single-post/2016/11/04/Afrofuturist-Writer-Transfers-Work-into-Film-Interview-with-Jason-Harris-about-Mothership-Mother-Verse

"Fly, Girl" is coming....

Finally, I can say with confidence that my debut novel, "Fly, Girl", will arrive at the end of this fall. Click on the picture above and you will be able to watch me share an excerpt from the book at the NuBohemia Cafe in Baltimore.  Click on the video at the top and catch an interview on KPFK Pacifica where I talk about "Fly, Girl" and Afrofuturism in general.

 

 

Click here to listen to K Tempest Bradford, adrienne maree brown, Ytasha Womack and myself  talking about Octavia Butler, Afrofuturism and Diversity in Science Fiction on the Marc Steiner Show (from April 2015).

future.jpg

REDLINES: BALTIMORE 2028 (2nd Edition)

AVAILABLE MAY 2017:


Mandela: The Last of our Pride (essay)

This is an essay that I wrote for my good friend Katia D. Ulysse for her Voices from Haiti Blog.



Interview about Redlines and New Futurism in the Contemporary's new publication, "The Scroll"